Interning with HWC: Heritage appreciation to take wing in Sri Lanka – experiences and ambitions

by Harini Dias Bandaranayake (with Pirintha Kulasingam & Aousten Aloysious)

“Knowing new landscapes and people brings more light into my understanding about culture and heritage; this is where I begin to explore and reflect on my visit to Kolkata”, 26 year-old Pirintha Kulasingham, an academic who teaches Art History at the University of Jaffna in northern Sri Lanka, told me. An enthusiastic and optimistic Aousten Aloysious, also a resident of Jaffna, studying architecture at the University of Moratuwa chimes in, “It’s the unbiased take and the nuanced way in which the walks were presented that made a difference to me.”

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Walking Heritage into Future Cities and the Potential for Historical Archaeology in Sri Lanka

by Ruth Young

Historical Archaeology at the Jaffna Workshop

After the main Heritage Walking events of the workshop at Jaffna, Sri Lanka, there was time before the group dispersed to unwind a little and talk in more general terms about Historical Archaeology. The concept of studying the recent past through archaeology is one that is new and untried in Sri Lanka; after all, there are abundant histories that cover the last 5-600 years, including the advent and impact of European colonialism, Independence and 20th century developments.

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Walking Heritage into Future Cities in Sri Lanka

by Gillian Juleff

It’s been a few weeks since returning from our busy and exciting project trip to Sri Lanka. To roll back a little, we originally planned the visit for early May but reluctantly had to abandon the plan following the devastating Easter bombings. Not wanting to relinquish this component of the project, we immediately rebooked our flights for June in the hope that the FCO advice against non-essential travel would be lifted by then. The weeks went by with no change and making plans for the visit seemed like tempting fate to conspire against us. On the very day I set to make a final decision on cancelling the trip the FCO lifted the advice and we were free to travel! This context is relevant because it explains why the entire trip, from booking transport and accommodation to arranging meetings and workshop, had to be put together in little more than a week.

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